RYERSON UNIVERSITY

Ryerson University, located in Toronto, ON, is a leading force in Canadian innovation, career-oriented learning, and futurism [1]. Although they only have 1 main campus in Toronto, and 74 programs offered, they still have a whopping 39,000 students enrolled [1]. Established in 1852, Ryerson is one of the oldest universities in Canada, in stark contrast to their modernist doctrines [1]. Their faculties range from arts, community services, communication and design, engineering and architectural design, law, science, Ted Rogers School of Management, to Yeates School of Graduate Studies [2]. At the helm of the Ryerson Rams is none other than their confusingly named mascot: Eggy the Ram [3]. At Ryerson, clubs are split into two categories: recreational, and competitive clubs; recreational clubs are geared towards participation, and networking through shared interest of a sport, while competitive has you play against other schools and teams at scheduled meetings, and times [4]. Ryerson is a very competitive school, in that it’s the most applied to in Ontario (relative to space) [5]. As well, Ryerson has over 900 affiliated facilities, 20 Canada Research Chairs, and 133 partner universities around the world [5]. Ryerson is a well-networked school, and as such, has accrued many affiliations including (but not limited to): COU, IAU, AUCC, and OUA [3].

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3

What was the biggest challenge in transitioning from high school to uni and how have you overcome it?

The biggest challenge in from high school to uni was the amount of readings. As you know, in high school, we did a minimum/didn't do any readings. We just study off from your teacher's/class notes to study for tests or exams. Unless you went to a self-directed learning school, you will have a hard time adjusting to it. As you know, in

1

Why did you choose your program? What makes it unique to you?

I choose Nursing because I like working with people who need help. Growing up, I had to go to the hospital for my ears. The only thing that I remember continuously that is stuck with me was having a relationship with the nurse who was always checking up on me. Which started my inspiration for what I want to be when I grow up. During grade 11, I was interested in learning about diseases so much that I would search it up on google and learn about it. What makes it unique is that Nursing is all about patients, it is a career to help save lives, give joy to people and their families, and support those in need. Another unique thing is that if you like to interact with new people every day then you will enjoy interacting with the patients and be able to create a nurse-client relationship with them.   

5

What is some advice you would give high school students when applying to your program?

My two biggest advice is to be ready to have a good foundation in Biology and make sure you aim/have a high average. Having a good foundation in Biology will make it easy for you to learn everything in your body. Not only that, most of your first-year courses are related to biology. So, try to find notes for Anatomy & Physiology or ask the upper-year who are in the program to send you their notes for Anatomy and Physiology during the summer so you can have an understanding of the course. You want to make sure you have a high average because Nursing is super competitive. Try taking easy courses so that you can aim for a higher average, for example, I went to night school and took Challenge and Change in Society to aim for the average goal I want.  

Can you briefly explain how your program works? (ex. do you spend time learning at both campuses? What are the advantages of a program like this?)

4

So in the Ryerson Nursing program, you can choose to be in the main site or you can do a collaborative program (George Brown or Centennial sites). If you pick the collaborative program, the first two years you will be at the site you applied to (for example, George Brown), and the last two years you will be at Ryerson. People think that you are not a Ryerson student but you are, so you will be having the same benefits just like a normal student would that goes to Ryerson. For example, you are allowed to go to SLC and get help at Ryerson. At the end of the day, you will be learning the same thing as someone who goes to main site nursing. The huge advantage of choosing the collaborative program is that it has a smaller class than Mainsite people so you can connect with people in your program and the professor of whatever course you are learning.

Nursing school, you have to do the readings to order to understand the concept, and also some of your class will test you from the textbooks. But the readings are so much to the point where it will take the whole day to. finish it. To order to overcome this problem is that I looked at my objectives and made notes on them because your professors are only testing you based on the objectives of your class. Also, this made it easier/faster to do the readings and didn't take all day to do it. 

JUICY

QUESTIONS

For a Ryerson & George Brown Nursing Student

2

What do you think is special about Ryerson/George Brown's campus life?

There are a lot of things that make it special about Ryerson/George Brown's campus life. For example, if you choose the Ryerson/George Brown site program, you will make friends so easily because of the small classes you will have with them. Not only that, 

 there are a lot of events that they host for us students to relax and enjoy with the new friends you made. Also, the campus is located in downtown Toronto; in front of the waterfront. Which has a beautiful view for you and your friends to hang out after class. What also makes it special about the Ryerson/George Brown's campus life is that there are multiple opportunities to make connections with people from other programs. 

 

A very special thank you to our interviewee...

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ANNAN MRIDHA

Hi guys, My name is Annan, a second-year Nursing student at George Brown/Ryerson collaborative program. I am here to answer any questions about the program/campus life. What I like to do in my free time is go out with my friends and partying but since covid is still here, I like to read and spend time with my family. If you have any other questions feel free to dm on Instagram. 

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1

Why did you choose your program? What makes it unique to you?

When I was in grade 11, I took an AP Psychology class and fell in love with everything-psychology. In grade 12, I did my co-op placement at an elementary school that specialized in teaching children with special needs. I really enjoyed working in this environment and thought studying psychology would be a great starting point for this type of a career. Ryerson stood out to me because of how diverse it was. The students at Ryerson are from all over the world and all over Canada, and I love learning and being surrounded by new perspectives. The campus was very inviting and exciting. I loved the idea of being right downtown. Within my first semester, I knew I made the right choice. My courses were so interesting and there were so many school clubs to join and ways to get involved.

5

What is some advice you would give high school students when applying to your program?

My advice to high schoolers applying to Ryerson’s Psychology program: focus on your grades, especially in grade 12. Acceptance is competitive based on grades. Ryerson also offers great scholarships that go very high depending on your final year average (top 6 university credit grades). So, aim high and do your best! My greatest advice overall is to practice self-care. Applying to universities can be extremely stressful and it is so important to take breaks and take care of your physical and mental health, whatever that may look like.

My advice before your first semester: check your email constantly for deadlines such as payments and course selection. Don’t buy textbooks ahead of time, always listen to what the professor has to say (many accept older editions that may be much more affordable or can be found online). Try to stay organized ahead of time with calendars and/or agendas. The courses provide the syllabus with all important due dates on the first day of class. Many professors will not remind you when things are due or when tests are coming up; it’s important to stay on top of things from early on. I also recommend looking into doing an exchange program where you can study abroad for a semester or 2!

What’s the biggest change from high school to university/college work and classes?

4

The biggest change from high school to university was the shift towards independence. Your professors will for the most part not even notice if you do not show up to lectures or if you do not complete a paper, but your grade will definitely suffer. You are responsible for taking all that you can from your university experience. Your professors give you the tools and resources and it is up to you to do your readings, attend lectures, and start assignments ahead of time. Extensions are not granted as easily as they were in high school and it is very easy to fail things if you do not put any effort in. I had never failed a paper or test before university and it was a shock the first time it happened, but I learned how to improve my work techniques and time-management skills. I found that most exams and papers were graded more harshly in university, but I also found the work to be much more rewarding and interesting to me. My favorite thing about the shift to university was the selection of courses available to me. There is a lot of room for freedom and you will truly get out of university what you are willing to put in. Good luck!

JUICY

QUESTIONS

For a Ryerson Psychology Student

2

What is the class environment like?

Most of my Ryerson classes have been very large in size with some lectures with a few hundred people. Even in these larger classes there are always ways to participate and ask questions. The students come from a diverse background and have many unique perspectives to offer. I highly recommend saying “hello” to those sitting near you (or making group chats for online learning) in order to build closer connections and have someone to help you out in your courses. The professors are approachable and offer their own hours for any extra help, which you should definitely take them up on. In terms of psychology courses, I have found that most offer the format of three multiple choice exams and one paper (worth about 25% each). If you require accommodations and can obtain the proper documentation, Ryerson is exceptional at helping you with your needs and providing you with resources (such as writing in the Test Centre or receiving extra time).

3

What do you think is special about your university’s campus life?

Ryerson’s campus is in the heart of downtown Toronto. With a skating rink in the middle of our buildings and the Eaton Centre across the street, there is always something to do between or after classes. My favourite thing about our campus is the Student Learning Centre building. The floors are themed and provide students with all types of study areas. There are quiet floors for those who require silence to study, and more social floors such as the “beach” floor (where I would hang out) where you can sit on a bean bag chair and study on your laptop while you watch downtown commotion from the windows. Something I found really cool about Ryerson was you might get a few lectures in the Cineplex movie theatres which I always loved. Ryerson always has something fun going on whether it’s bringing in therapy dogs on certain days, or offering bake sales for charities, or handing out “self-care” kits around exam times. I have always felt excited to be on campus and have always kept an eye out for fun things to get involved in.

 

A very special thank you to our interviewee...

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MONICA RIVAS

My name is Monica and I recently graduated from Ryerson’s Psychology program with a minor in philosophy. I cherished my time at Ryerson and hope my advice can help you prepare for the next 4 years of your life! I was involved in Ryerson’s photography club which I loved, and when I wasn’t studying, I was working part-time at restaurants around downtown Toronto. These jobs helped me save up for Ryerson’s exchange program where I studied for a semester in Australia which worked towards my degree. I highly recommend Ryerson for an enriching university experience! You can reach out to me if you have more questions about my experiences with Ryerson via email monicarivas7@icloud.com or Instagram @monnie711. Good luck!

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1

Why did you choose your program? What makes it unique to you?

I chose my program because I love what mechanical engineering has to offer. It is one of the broadest and encompassing fields of engineering where one can find a speculation that they enjoy. Mechanical Engineering gives me the opportunity to go beyond what can be considered in my field and still relate and even implement it into my projects. That level of freedom is what is most appealing to me.  For example, in my third year, I can specialize in Mechatronics which allows me to also get a good understanding of electrical and computer systems. The fact that my field enables me to build cool robots or even an Iron Man suit is awesome!

5

What is some advice you would give high school students when applying to your program?

For your first year, you should definitely brush up on your calculus, physics, and chemistry that you did in grade 12.  A lot of the material for the first semester is just review and if you can overcome the increase in complexity for the questions, you will definitely master your first year. Make sure to always do your homework and the suggested problems for each course. You will find that your midterms or Exams use similar questions or even the same. Also don't be afraid to ask your professors, teachers assistants, or even other students for help in understanding a topic or subject. Your profs and TAs are there to help you and you will find that the struggle that you may face is shared between many other students.

Does your school have a co-op program?

4

Ryerson does offer a co-op program for engineering students. In your third year can opt to enrol in the Co-operative Internship. You need to have a GPA of over 1.67 in order to qualify but it is recommended by students and faculty to have a 3.3. You can also improve your chances of getting an interview by joining clubs or doing extracurriculars. If you get a position you will usually spend a period of 12-16 months working there and then return to complete your fourth year.

JUICY

QUESTIONS

For a Ryerson Mechanical Engineering Student

2

How would you describe your first year at Ryerson?

It was definitely an adjustment. I wasn't used to commuting and spending so much time away from home so consistently. Over time that can be quite draining and tiresome. Furthermore, I wasn't used to being in an auditorium of 500 other students all focused on a single topic. In the beginning, it was definitely daunting. However, as you continue to go through and learn the ropes you get used to it and then learn to overcome it. I'll be honest and say that I had imposter syndrome and felt that I wasn't smart enough to be in engineering.  But after changing study habits and talking and meeting with others I overcame that as well and feel more ready and engaged to take on the second year.

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How would you describe the workload and work-life balance in your program?

If you're going into engineering you should expect a pretty heavy course load when compared to other programs. It could be very difficult to find a work-life balance, especially in your first year. You will find yourself often struggling to finish work on time while also studying for multiple midterms close together. That's why I recommend to always get your work done as soon as possible. Your time is extremely precious and you don't want to spend it cramming 3 different courses at once. Also, I suggest finding a relaxing hobby or activity to do to keep the stress of school out of your mind. It could get overwhelming sometimes so you need something to keep your head level and calm. You might find it hard to keep up socially so try to take your breaks with some friends so you can catch up and feel better emotionally.

 

A very special thank you to our interviewee...

ANDRICK PUNIT

Andrick Punit is a second-year student at Ryerson University pursuing a Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering with an anticipated specialization in Mechatronics. He is currently a Developer for bridges and is responsible for developing and running the technical aspects of the company. Andrick is experienced in computer programming and mechanical design and has worked as a project lead in multiple design teams. Contact him at: andrick.punit@gmail.com

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1

Why did you choose your program? What makes it unique to you?

I chose my program because I love what mechanical engineering has to offer. It is one of the broadest and encompassing fields of engineering where one can find a speculation that they enjoy. Mechanical Engineering gives me the opportunity to go beyond what can be considered in my field and still relate and even implement it into my projects. That level of freedom is what is most appealing to me.  For example, in my third year, I can specialize in Mechatronics which allows me to also get a good understanding of electrical and computer systems. The fact that my field enables me to build cool robots or even an Iron Man suit is awesome!

5

How would you describe the workload and work-life balance?

This program has a pretty prominent workload, and as the semester comes closer and closer to an end, it increases and therefore it’s hard to have a work-life balance. The majority of the time, you are either studying for a midterm or completing an assignment. In this program, many of the courses have two midterms; therefore, once the midterm season starts in October, it doesn’t end until exam week comes. On top of those midterms, you have weekly assessments for almost every course and even presentations for some. The workload mainly increases near the end of the semester, when you’re trying to balance studying for the exams as well as learning new content. However, one advantage Ryerson has is that it gives the students a couple of days after classes end and before the exams begin, therefore you have time to study for the exams.

Which electives do you recommend that students take?

4

When it comes to electives, I suggest that students take electives that are not related to their program, the only reason being that they can be exposed to different courses and escape what they learn in their program. One thing we tell students at bridges is that their program does not define them. Just because you are in a business program does not mean that you can’t take astronomy electives. Take it and learn something new and exciting. Don’t be confined by your program. For example, in first-year, I took a sociology course and an astronomy course as my electives. They were interesting, and they helped me learn something other than accounting and finance.

JUICY

QUESTIONS

For a Ryerson Accounting & Finance Student

2

What advice do you have for high school students applying to your program?

One thing that I would suggest to high school students that plan on applying to this program is to take both grade 11 and grade 12 accounting if it’s available to you! Even though it is not a prerequisite for this program, it will be beneficial to you in first year. I know many people who are in this program and are struggling with the first-year accounting course because they have no accounting background. Accounting is not as easy as it seems, and learning the basics is extremely important, just like it is for any other course. So if you can, take both grade 11 and grade 12 accounting!

3

What’s the biggest change from high school to university/college work and classes?

The most significant change from high school to university is the pace of the courses. In high school, you are most likely to complete one chapter in 1.5-2 weeks. However, in university, you learn one chapter in about 3 hours. The professors expect you to read the chapter or chapters before class and come to class with any questions or concerns that you have. The reason they ask you do to this is that in class, they mainly give examples to help you understand the material further. Also, the assessment style and weightage are different in university than it is in high school. Students usually undermine small assignments that weigh about 5-10%. But those assignments can boost up your mark and can also cushion it if you don’t get such a good mark on a midterm or exam. In university, you usually have 3-4 assessments that weigh a significant amount versus the plethora of tests and quizzes that weigh small percentages in high school.

A very special thank you to our interviewee...

LEESA PANCHAL

Leesa Panchal is a second-year Accounting and Finance student at Ryerson University. She plans on majoring in accounting and pursuing a minor in law. She is currently the Co-Chief Executive Officer alongside Chiddhanya Alagesan. Her primary job is to oversee the function of the bridges team and implement the organization’s vision and mission. She strives to better the outreach of bridges and the impact that has on first-year university students. Outside of school and bridges, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, dancing and nature. Leesa has experience from a plethora of environments, including academic and non-academic, which all require different skills and strengths. She’s open to any questions or inquiries, so please feel free to reach out and message her!

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